member profile

Meet a Member

We ask AIM Members a few tricky questions about themselves and their businesses.

Michelle Carlyle, Director, Thought Ratio Michelle Carlyle, Director, Thought Ratio

What is the key lesson you have learned from doing business over the past 12 months?

The past 12 months for me has been a steep and exciting learning curve as I’ve opened the doors to my new business, Thought Ratio Pty Ltd. I’ve come from managing large teams and projects in a global organisation, to managing a small start-up with all the opportunities and challenges that presents. To say it has been a big change is an understatement.

“Successful change comes through maintaining a positive and resilient mindset.”

I’ve had to dig deep into my own resources of courage, positivity, and resilience to ensure a successful start. That has required daily effort and focus. With all change, there are some unexpected setbacks, but there are also moments of great celebration. A key lesson has been that successful change comes through maintaining a positive and resilient mindset. 

What’s one thing you’d like other AIM members to know about you or your business? 

The one thing I’d like to share about myself and Thought Ratio is that every thought entering our minds has an impact on our performance and wellbeing. Habitual unhelpful thinking styles, cognitive biases, and negative behavioural patterns can be detected, challenged, and modified. Believing you can directly influence your experiences means you are capitalising on what’s possible. Combining this with positivity and confidence will broaden the scope of your thinking into new ideas, and build on your knowledge and skills. 

At Thought Ratio, we have brought together our years of practical experience in business and senior leadership, with the science supporting resilience. It's a powerful fusion that we love bringing to life in our programs. 

Do you have a ‘most disliked’ piece of leadership jargon?

My answer to this question digs a bit deeper than a simple yes or no. Because I believe that language is a mirror into our thoughts and beliefs, my “most disliked” leadership language is that which is not mindful. It’s a leader’s responsibility to notice, question, and analyse information they receive, and then respond thoughtfully. If their language doesn’t reflect this process, then they’re likely to be relying mostly on their beliefs and past experiences which may have limitations. 

There’s a lot of jargon out there. I hear “bandwidth” used a lot and of course it’s used in the negative. “We don’t have the bandwidth right now.” Whilst that may be true, have the options been considered or has habitual “black and white” thinking taken place?

I’m all for honesty in our language that is mindful, respects all parties, and is open for discussion. This language will develop trust, open up opportunities, and move the organisation closer to becoming a thriving and high-performing organisation.

What is the business advice you most often share with others?

Take responsibility for your own thoughts and behaviours. Know your strengths and what makes you excited when you’re in a state of flow. 

Ensure that every day you’re open to new ideas and learning. Education, in whatever form it takes, is critical for individuals, whether you’re a leader or not. Connections and meaningful relationships are also foundations for success that you need to maintain. And finally, move your body. Exercise is vital for a healthy brain, and a healthy brain will make better decisions.

Michelle Carlyle, FAIM, Founder/Director at www.thoughtratio.com.au

Leadership

It’s still a man’s world, even on International Women’s Day.

It’s still a man’s world, even on International Women’s Day.

This was the verdict of audience at the Melbourne AIM IWD Great Debate, who voted almost unanimously for the positive team’s case that Australia in 2017 is still a man’s world.
This was the verdict of audience at the Melbourne AIM IWD Great Debate, who voted almost unanimously for the positive team’s case that Australia in 2017 is still a man’s world.

leadership

Introducing Insight Edge for 2017

Introducing Insight Edge for 2017

Welcome to the new professional development newsletter.
Welcome to the new professional development newsletter.

team-building

Tools for team-building

Tools for team-building

There are a large range of tools out there to assist with team-building. AIM's Team Management Profile is a tool that addresses the needs of the individual and their team.
There are a large range of tools out there to assist with team-building. AIM's Team Management Profile is a tool that addresses the needs of the individual and their team.

Teamwork

Building high-performing teams

Building high-performing teams

Building teams that are effective and efficient can be a long and complicated process. Make sure you and your colleagues are meeting the most crucial factors of a high-performing team.
Building teams that are effective and efficient can be a long and complicated process. Make sure you and your colleagues are meeting the most crucial factors of a high-performing team.

strategy

How policy can support your strategy

How policy can support your strategy

All organisations need a strategy. But they also need a plan to implement that strategy. Policy is one way to turn your strategy into a reality.
All organisations need a strategy. But they also need a plan to implement that strategy. Policy is one way to turn your strategy into a reality.

leadership

From the Knowledge Centre

From the Knowledge Centre

A selection of useful digital and print resources on building effective teams and setting strategy from the AIM Knowledge Centre. Access is free to all AIM Members, online, or at one of our AIM libraries ...
A selection of useful digital and print resources on building effective teams and setting strategy from the AIM Knowledge Centre. Access is free to all AIM Members, online, or at one of our AIM libraries ...

meetings

Meetings: Why you're almost always wasting your time

Meetings: Why you're almost always wasting your time

We've all been in meetings that have dragged on and not addressed any of the issues they were designed to solve. If meetings are so often inefficient, why do we still have them?
We've all been in meetings that have dragged on and not addressed any of the issues they were designed to solve. If meetings are so often inefficient, why do we still have them?

decision making

From the Knowledge Centre

From the Knowledge Centre

A selection of useful digital and print resources on decision-making from the AIM Knowledge Centre. Access is free to all AIM Members, online, or at one of our AIM libraries around the country.
A selection of useful digital and print resources on decision-making from the AIM Knowledge Centre. Access is free to all AIM Members, online, or at one of our AIM libraries around the country.